Tag Archives: fungal genomes

Byssothecium circinans genome released

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the Byssothecium circinans  CBS 113818.  Bcircinans  is classified in the family Massarinaceae (Ascomycota; Dothideomycetes;Pleosporales), and is currently the only completed genomes from this family.

Byssothecium circinans  was contributed to the 1KFG project by Pedro Crous and Manfred Binder at CBS-KNAW.  As always, please contact the PIs associated with unpublished 1KFG genomes for permission prior to the use of any data in publications.

Coniochaeta sp genome release

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the genome of Coniochaeta sp. PMI_546, a fungus in the Coniochaetales family (Ascomyocta; Sordariomycetes) found living as saprotrophs, leaf and root endophytes, and plant pathogens. This isolate was cultivated from roots of the eastern cottonwood Populus deltoides.

This isolate was collected as part of the Plant Microbe Interface DOE project by Greg Bonito and Rytas Vilgalys. For use of these data prior to publication please contact these PIs.

Clavulina sp genome sequenced

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the genome of Clavulina sp. PMI_390 , a Basidiomycete fungus in the family Clavulinaceae (Cantharellales) that forms coral fungi structures. It is found as an ECM fungus associated with roots of pine and poplar trees.

This isolate was collected as part of the Plant Microbe Interface DOE project by Greg Bonito and Rytas Vilgalys. For use of these data prior to publication please contact these PIs.

Thozetella sp. PMI_491 genome released

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the genome of Thozetella sp. PMI_491 (Berkeley 1881), a Chaetosphaeriaceae fungus found growing on bark in Australia.

This isolate was collected as part of the Plant Microbe Interface DOE project by Greg Bonito and Rytas Vilgalys. For use of these data prior to publication please contact these PIs.

Thozetella spores

Macroventuria anomochaeta genome release

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the Macroventuria anomochaeta van der Aa genome.   M. anomochaeta is classified in the family Didymellaceae (Ascomycota; Dothideomycetes; Pleosporales), and is one of two sequenced genome from this family. This isolate was found on decaying canvas in the desert in South Africa.

Macroventuria anomochaeta was contributed to the 1KFG project by Pedro Crous and Manfred Binder at CBS-KNAW.  As always, please contact the PIs associated with unpublished 1KFG genomes for permission prior to the use of any data in publications.

1000 Fungal genomes project is underway

Our proposal to sequence 1000+ Fungal genomes was funded by the DOE’s JGI. This site represents a gathering of the information about the project and will link to additional resources tracking the progress of the project.

With an estimated 1.5 million species, Fungi represent one of the largest branches of the Tree of Life.  They have an enormous impact on human affairs and ecosystem functioning, owing to their diverse activities as decomposers, pathogens, and mutualistic symbionts.  And perhaps more than any other group of nonphotosynthetic organisms, fungi are essential biological components of the global carbon cycle.  Collectively, they are capable of degrading almost any naturally occurring biopolymer and numerous human-made ones.  As such, fungi hold considerable promise in the development of alternative fuels, carbon sequestration and bioremediation of contaminated ecosystems.

The use of fungi for the continued benefit of humankind, however, requires an accurate understanding of how they interact in natural and synthetic communities.  The ability to sample environments for complex fungal metagenomes is rapidly becoming a reality and will play an important part in harnessing fungi for industrial, energy and climate management purposes.  However, our ability to accurately analyze these data relies on well-characterized, foundational reference data of fungal genomes.

To bridge this gap in our understanding of fungal diversity, an international research team in collaboration with the Joint Genome Institute of the Department of Energy has embarked on a five-year project to sequence 1000 fungal genomes from across the Fungal Tree of Life.  The team comprises Joseph Spatafora (Oregon State University), Jason Stajich (University of California at Riverside), Kevin McCluskey (Fungal Genetics Stock Center), Pedro Crous (Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures, Netherlands), Gillian Turgeon (Cornell University), Daniel Lindner (USDA Forest Service), Kerry O’Donnell and Todd Ward (USDA ARS), Antonis Rokas (Vanderbilt University), Louise Glass (University of California at Berkeley), Betsy Arnold (University of Arizona), Francis Martin (INRA, France) and Igor Grigoriev (JGI DOE).  The overall plan is to fill in gaps in the Fungal Tree of Life by sequencing at least two reference genomes from the more than 500 recognized families of Fungi.  In doing so, this project has the core goal of providing reference information to inform research on plant-microbe interactions, microbial emission and capture of greenhouse gasses, and environmental metagenomic sequencing.