Rhizophagus irregularis (Glomus intraradices) genome release

The long road of sequencing a Glomus genome has borne the fruit of a recently released genome for Rhizophagus irregularis (Glomus intraradices) http://genome.jgi.doe.gov/Gloin1/Gloin1.home.html.  R. irregularis is an  arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus which forms symbiotic relationship with plant roots in important crop plants (Soybean, Rice, Maize, Poplar trees). The genome was sequenced through the JGI Mycorrhizal sequencing CSP.  It was contributed by collaborators at INRA, Oak Ridge National Lab,  and  Université de Toulouse. As always, please contact the lead contact and PIs associated with unpublished 1KFG genomes for permission prior to the use of any data in publications.

Also see “The long hard road to a completed Glomus intraradices genome” for some background in the previous description of the work that needed to be done.

Patellaria atrata genome release

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the Patellaria atrata genome http://genome.jgi.doe.gov/Patat1/Patat1.home.html.  Patellaria atrata (Patellariales, Patellariaceae) is a saprotrophic fungus that colonizes preferentially exposed phloem fibers of wood and the decay mode resembles that of a white rot.  It was contributed to the 1KFG project by Manfred Binder and Pedro Crous of Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures KNAW, Netherlands, and represents the first genome sequenced for the order Patellariales.  As always, please contact the lead contact and PIs associated with unpublished 1KFG genomes for permission prior to the use of any data in publications.

Lichtheimia hyalospora v1.0 genome release

1KFG is pleased to announce the public release of the Lichtheimia hyalospora genome http://genome.jgi.doe.gov/Lichy1/Lichy1.home.html.  The genus Lichtheimia belongs to the family Lichtheimiaceae (Mucorales, Mucoromycotina) of the zygomycetous fungi.  Mucorales includes numerous well-known fungi such as Rhizopus and Phycomyces, but L. hyalospora represents the first genomic sequence of the Lichtheimiaceae.  Lichtheimia is a ubiquitous thermotolerant soil zygomycete, which grows between 200C and 550C, with rapid mycelial growth occurring between 37 and 420C. Its thermotolerance enables the fungus to survive the digestive tract of mammals and it is often found in animal intestinal contents and feces. It can cause ‘self-heating’ of animal feed stored under moist conditions.  It was contributed to the 1KFG project by Andrii Gryganski of Duke University and Jason Stajich of University of California at Riverside.  As always, please contact the lead contact and PIs associated with unpublished 1KFG genomes for permission prior to the use of any data in publications.